Brexit Motor FAQs

  • Will a digital version be acceptable?

    No, you will need to have a physical copy. A digital copy stored on a mobile device, such as an iPhone or tablet, will not be accepted.  You can either request for your insurer to post you a hard copy of the document, or they can send you a digital version which you must print out.

  • Do I need to print my green card on green paper or card?

    No, there is no longer a requirement for the green card to be printed onto green coloured paper.  Printing the green card document onto white paper will be valid.  However, you must have a physical copy of the green card as a digital version will not be accepted.

  • What if my policy is due for renewal when I am abroad?

    You will need two Green Cards - one for each policy. If you change insurers, ask both your existing and your new insurer to provide you with a Green Card.

  • Will I need to show my insurance documents when I cross the border into the EU? Will I also need to show the documents when I move from one EU member state to another? 

    You may be required to show documents at the border when entering the EU, but this will be a decision for the border authorities to take. You may also be subject to police checks while driving abroad and you will also need to be able to present the document at the scene if you are involved in an accident.

      

  • Will authorities in EU countries recognise the documents – or could I still be told I need to buy cover from a local insurer while I am driving abroad? 

    EU member states will all recognise the Green Card document. Provided you have these documents, you will not need to purchase additional insurance from a local insurer.   

    The Green Card system has a standardised format that has been agreed by all EU member states (including the UK) and is currently used for travel outside the EU to other Green Card member countries (you can find a full list of Green Card member countries here.)  

  •  If I have comprehensive motor insurance, will this automatically cover me if my car is damaged or stolen abroad?

    All UK motor insurance providers will continue to provide the legal minimum motor insurance cover for travel to EEA countries if the driver is carrying a valid Green Card. You will, therefore, not need to purchase additional third-party motor insurance cover when travelling to these countries with a UK-registered vehicle.

    Fully comprehensive motor insurance provides coverage for you and your vehicle as well as other people – this is more than is provided by third-party policies.

    Not all insurers will automatically extend fully comprehensive cover for travel abroad, so it is advisable to carefully read your policy documents and contact your insurer to check what aspects of your policy apply while you are driving abroad.

  • I drive in the EU regularly in my own private car. Will I need to tell my insurer every time I travel?    

    A Green Card will automatically provide you with a guarantee of insurance for a minimum of 15 days. Insurers can also specify that it covers a longer period if this is required, so ask for this if you need it.  

    However, at the point at which you renew your motor insurance policy, you will also need to ensure you have a new Green Card for your new policy (even if you are still abroad on the date your original policy expires). If you decide to switch to a new insurer, you will need to request a new Green Card from that insurer as well.

  • Do I need to tell them what countries I will be visiting? Are the rules different depending on where I intend to travel?

    Travelling to EU member states only – the Green Card document itself is designed so it can be used in the same way across every EU member state. The Green Card will specify which countries you are allowed to drive in. Under the current rules, it will always cover you for each EU member state. However, your insurer may still ask you to confirm which countries you intend to travel to.   

    If travelling to a Green Card country that is not an EU member state then you will need to inform your insurer which countries you will be visiting as you will not automatically be covered for driving in any country outside the EU, even if they are part of the Green Card system.

  • I run a business where I employ drivers who regularly cross the border into the EU. Can I arrange their insurance for them or will they need their own documents?  

    As an employer, you will be able to arrange insurance cover on behalf of your employees, as you do today.  

    However, each of your employees will have an individual legal responsibility to carry these documents. Driving for employment or business purposes would not exempt anyone from needing to carry a Green Card.

    A Green Card is required to cover the registration number of the individual vehicle, so a Green Card will be needed to cover each vehicle insured under one policy when being driven in the EU.

    If your employees change vehicles, they will need to carry the Green Card that is registered to the registration of the vehicle they are driving.

    If the vehicle is towing a trailer, you will also need a separate green card for that trailer.

  • Can I obtain a Green Card to cover my fleet of vehicles?

    A Green Card is required to cover the registration number of the individual vehicle, regardless of whether it is part of a fleet. One Green Card will be needed to cover each vehicle insured under one policy when being driven in the EU. 

    Most commercial fleet motor policies will have been purchased through a broker.  If this is the case then businesses should speak to their broker about issuing Green Cards. Some brokers may have the ability to issue green cards on behalf of the insurer, others will go via the insurer.

    If your employees change vehicles, they will need to carry the Green Card that is registered to the registration of the vehicle they are driving.

    If the vehicle is towing a trailer, you will also need a separate green card for that trailer.

    It may be the case that the insurer/broker doesn’t have the detailed registration of each vehicle within your fleet.  You may need to provide this information to your insurer or broker if requested.